Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 32
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
wantsto be speaker. his life. e highest priorit9 in he's achieved it. the other big difference john boehehr was once a committee chairman. he pushed legisla$ion throughl he knows how to make deals@at the coittee levels and he believes in the houseworkiwn. righting legislation in the hands of a tight-knit group of peoplea"ound the speake dennis hastert ntued that, nancy pelosi continued that. john boehner is unwinding that concentration of power, making the house a@differt place. >>i think he's got a ot. >> at @@becoming the president? >> yes. >> i don't see that, john. >> just thk about it. >> i just think there are other people are. >> his brand ofrepublicanism would carry. >> but i n't think has the@ -- either the bition or personality@todo that. >> he likes golf too ch! go on campaign trails. >> what about eisenhowe"? eisenhower liked golf a lot >> exit @@estion,@s hn boehner brout civili back to congress, yes or no?@ >> i think to a great @@extent. he is morealmer, asonable, rational guy. he done a good job dog that. >> he's la back, but he's representing a republican caulk tha
for a solution that would require both big cuts in spending and more revenue. >> so the bottom line is this -- any agreement to reduce our deficit is going to require tough decisions and balanced solutions. the president urged congress to reach a deal now. >> if the united states government, for the first time, cannot pay its bills, if it defaults, then the consequences for the u.s. economy will be signicant andnpredictable. and that is not a good thing. >> we have a special report coming up later on the moral arguments in washington's intense debate over debt, spending and taxes. >>> in new york, there were celebrations after that state legalized gay marriage. some religious groups, however, continued to voice their objection to the law. new york's catholic bishops said the law will undermine marriage and family. in a separate statement, the bishop of brooklyn warned catholic schoolagains bestowing any distinctions and honors on the governor or on legislators who voted for the law. >>> in other news, palestinian leaders formally announced their decision to seek united nations recog
for the auto industry. we examine the new round of labor talks between the u.a.w. and detroit's big three. >> ifill: ray suarez gets an update on the turmoil in libya. >> brown: and we close with a paul solman story about a convicted murderer and middle school dropout who now makes $80,000 a year after completing college while behind bars. >> these are my dreams. i fit in right here, but this is what i'm looking at, this is where i want to be, this is where i can be, this is where i deserve to be. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scie
was the big question. it was cleveland himself who recommended going on a boat. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: senate democrats vowed to stay in session around the clock to resolve the debt crisis. house republicans modified their plan
it would have made a big difference in my household. frankly, i don't think 10% is a bad number. i think you get the number too high, and you end up putting too much of your grade on filling out forms at home where you might or might not have gotten help with it. as opposed to measuring what you have actually learned or what your participation level is. so, i -- i'm not convinced that grading homework really should be a huge part of your grade. >> but do you think homework is part of learning for sdents. >> sure. >> it seems like there's an hour in the classroom and there should be a couple of hours after the classroom as well. >> then you run into problems where kids in middle school have six or seven different teachers, and if each teacher gives a half hour of homework, at night, you have got kids with three-and-a-half hours of homework after they get home from school and do their chores. which really is unreasonable. you have eliminated childhood at that point. >> there is no one-size-fits-all formula. as one of the arguments that has been brought up in favor of this policy, there are
we have a small wall and we're gradually moving to a big wall. and we'l graduly see one brick after another. it's hard work. it's partly imagination, a lot of it is perspation. i mean aot of it is just real grind in the laboratory. it needs money it needs resource. it needs focus d i ink there's many really good people including some at my own institution rockefeller university who are doing excellent work in this area. >> where are we in terms of are reaping t benefits of the map of the human again ly. >> switch to the genome. >> yes. what i can say about that. the first thing is some people have been a little disappointed because they felt you know we got the genome that was nearly the end of the story. >> dow understand their disappointment. >> i understand this because in fact we should have made it clear as scientists is actually the beginning of the story. i have a metaphor for this. if you were writing a play, the sequence of the genome is like having the list of characters at the beginning of the play. and the job, you can't write the play without the list of characters, tha
and protecting itself. >> to which one answer might be "so why is it so big?" i mean, it is a vast territorial power which has, of course, significant ethnic minorities. they have large territories. >> rose: so you're suggesting that there is a history of chinese imperialism and any other historian who suggests that... >> no, no. i think that henry kissinger is clearly right. that it is not an eansionist power inhe sense thatfor exame, russia was. expanding constantly but i think... >> rose: and certain after the war. >> but i think that what you see already is a chinese strategic doctrine and kissinger, i think, would not dispute this which stakes an ambitious claim to a spheref influence as we rightly said and that would provoke conflict so i i think we're entering very very difficult times >> rose: well, your oxford colleague neil ferguson suggests that nationalistic forces will overwhelm and that there will be a conflict between... in some way between the united states and china. >> well any historian who has looked at the history of the rise and fall of great powers would say such shifts
, to the red, white, and blue. in the big apple and elsewhere, the day will end with the usual bursts of color, lighting the night sky-- a once-a-year moment, cherished by millions. but, in some places, this year, the sky will be silent. raging wildfires and dry weather in arizona, new mexico, and texas have forced authorities to cancel fourth of july fireworks in certain areas. >> a lot of people are going to be really disappointed, i thinkç >> woodruff: the patriotic spirit isn't felt only in the united states. these u.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
on chancellor merkel's viewpoint. >> angela merkel warned that people should not be expecting one big, spectacular solution. this is a long, ongoing process. it is a matter of small steps. we have to make sure that greece becomes competitive again, that it gets its debt down, and that will not be achieved with one big, spectacular step. president medvedev also had some words to say on the euro. he says he is cautiously optimistic that it will pull through. he says it is an extortion attempt, said nations have never tried before, and it is wishing europe bloc -- he said it is an extraordinary attempts, such that nations have never tried before, and he is pushing europe luck. >> some clouds on the horizon. a closely watched survey said dennis analysts and institutional investors are in anticipating a weaker performance in the months to come -- a closely watched survey said analysts and institutional investors are anticipating a weaker performance in the months to come. use 9 last month. reflecting concern that the debt crisis, could spread to italy. however, the drop in german expectati
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
on the show time series the big c. here's a look at that series. >> the doctor. oh, pardon me, sir. dr. sherman, hi. my name's kathy. >> i'm the nurse. >> you're not a drug rap, are you? >> no, no, i'm not. i'm a dying woman who is trying to see the right doctor and ask him if he s any advice on how to save my life. the best i can do is spend the last two hours a day on hold from your office to find out if anyone's canceled. that's not okay. >> i'm going to asyou to leave. >> i will not leave. >> charlie: the big c is currently airing on show time mondays at 10:30 p.m. i'm pleased to have laura lean -- laura linney back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: when you look at that, what do you think? >> it's a weird, you know sort of tapestry of what you feel and i always feel slightly embarrassed when i look at myself. >> charlie: really? you don't look at this clinically and say i can't wait to have somebody watch it. >> i also good off camera. i give performances off camera to people who would never -- i mean, on camera i try my best. but there's, the further i get awa
big it's sapping the drive out of people and keeping the government fromming from full capacity. the solution is not complicated. if you're spending more than your taking in you need to spe less of. there's no symptom more menacing than our debt and we begin to liberate our economy and our future. charlie: we'll are have much more on the story tomorrow from new york and washington. also this evening phil mickelson. the great golfer stops to talk about higame and passions. >> i play my best when i'm challenged. the more challenging the shot the better i pull it off so i have to challenge myself. i can't hit a seven-iron lay-up shot if i can reach it way hybrid or three-wood i have to challenge myse. >> charlie: we conclud the evening with steve carell and the new film "crazy, stupid love." >> when people try to be funny it doesn't necessarily work that way you play it honestly and it evolves by that and by the same token if an actor is known for comedic work goes to do a drama you don't have to walk around with a frown on your face because you're on a drama. people don't know in
decimates the economy, then obama would be a big loser. >> rose: also this evening a conversation with paul krugman and david brooks th columnists at the "new york times". this conversation took pla before the president's press conference and therefore was edited accordingly. >> whave no consensus in our political system. there is no center. we have no consensus about what all to be happening. so if you try to strike a lo-term deal you're basically stking a deal that nobody actually beeves and that isot going to be adhered to. i think we buy we buy se time. shouldn't be negotiating at all about the debt ceiling but we buy someime and give the voters another chance to weigh in. >> we really need to cut i think some of the rating agencies have said this, we need to cut $4 trillion to sort of stabilize debt levels and if we don't do that that's really bad news. and then the second thing i do think both parties may find it useful to have a framework. no, we're to the going to write a plan that is going to dictate the next ten years of politics but both parties may find it extremely useful to ha
. and this going on in washington is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at how different washington d.c. operated than every other business in america. where most american businesses make the hard choices to pay their bills, live within their means. in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. well, i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested businesses as usual. he had ner routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. here was a president asking for the largest debt increase in american history on the heels of the largest spending binge in american history. and here's what we got for that massive spending binge. a new health-care bill that most americans never asked for. a stimulus bill that's more effective in producing material for late night comedians than it was in producing jobs. and a national debt that has gotten so out of hand it sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united st
. senior citizens will take some hits. there will be -- education will take big hits with the pell grants. to achieve the so-called cuts they are talking about would mean that a lot of people could be severely hurt. >> but we cannot sustain this level of debt forever. >> we cannot, but here is what is wrong -- we have to get control of the deficit, but we do not want to do anything on the revenue side. all of the pain is coming from the cuts. you are still leaving those tax cuts to the wealthy untouched, still living subsidies in for the oil companies untouched. everything to the poor folks and middle-class folks, they bear the brunt of it. >> met monday this week -- "my view is we should have a president who agrees to cut, cap, and balance the budget" -- mitt romney. >> he does not want to get too far out on a limb in the spirit in the grand bargain, there were revenue increases, closing loopholes that nobody wants to defend, except for grover norquist, who is having an incredible amount of power in this debate. there's a counter intuitive thing here. you have to spend some to get out of
islamic communy. >> yes, very big debate. >> rose: and tt debate is? >> tha debate is, ones that whether you can go create an islamic state through the current political democratic way, or that democracy is the enemy of islam, it's not an islamic way so you have to topple it through, you know, an undemocratic way. i think there is a dete on that. and then the second underlying debate is if we are in power, should we still be democracy. so more directly into what they callslamic wing. >> rose: and what wod be the role model for that? >> well, this is the problem. because they don't have what we call the practical example in reality. t they wou have like the way when prophet mohammed rule or -- 1400 years ago. >> re: do most people in indonesia consid iran a success? >> only minorities. turkey is much more a mod. >> rose: and turkey is what indonesia would le to be? >> some indonesia is, the justice party look at turkey as a model. but some of the people saying that turkey is not a finished model. it's going to the right model. >> rose: there are people who think this includes the prime mi
of politics involved here in terms of as you said, they made it a big case from the start and said they had the case. >> yeah, they said they had the case. and we did hear from cyrus mance today. also ken thompson the lawyer for the accuser, for the made, he criticized the manhattan district attorney, said that they perhaps were fearing they mr. going to lose the case. they were setting up for a dismissal. they were very critical. he even referenced manhattan district attorney's recent cases that had failed. so this is a very interesting dynamic. and this could be a major blow for cyrus mance, the manhattan district attorney. today we did not see that strong, confident prosecution we saw in the last two courtrooms. >> brown: laurie levenson, pick up on that last part. the split that we saw when the attorney for the accuser came out was very strongly going after the prosecutor for dropping the ball, for not picking up, and really telling him, do not let go of this. how unusual is something like that? >> well, you know, this is a big advocate for the victim. and a lot of victims don't have su
to create the next big thing? but make sure that production is here. >> brown: it was the third such social media event for the president this year. in april, he took part in a town hall hosted by facebook, and in january, he answered video questions submittedia youtube. for the president and other politicians and leaders, twitter especially has become an increasingly essential communications tool. republican mitt romney used the service in early june to announce to his followers he was running for president. and then, to keep them in the loop about campaign events. and with more than half a million followers, former vice presidential candidate sarah palin is a frequent user, sometimes posting multiple times a day. but there are also cautionary tales including, most recently, congressman anthony weiner, whose tweeted sexual messages and photos opened him to ridicule and ended in his resignation. >> now, our next question comes from someone you may know-- this is speaker boehner. >> oh, there you go. ( laughter ) >> brown: as for today's town hall, some of the president's political opponents
-- there are loopholes they need to close. but charles' point is white. these are tiny, tiny little drops in a big ocean. there inot enough in corporate jets or even the hedge fund guys, although i would like to. they have to raise revenues, i hate to say it, on the middle class. this is the point that gets lost on this. everybody is in this boat. there is no way out of it unless every single american does something. >> raise revenues on the shrinking middle class, mark. >> everybody is in it, and evan is right -- evan addressed the possibility of default. when that happens, the federal government of the united states, which bars or 40 cents of every dollar we spend every single day, is faced with the option -- do you pay a sergeant in combat in kandahar, a grandmother with a 1-bedroom apartment in social security check, or to meet the obligations of bankers who are holding their debt in beijing and beverly hills? the answer is simple. the prior claim is on the second group. the reality is we are talking about -- the president is proposing increasing taxes, revenues, by 1% over the next 10 years. $400 b
. there are two big reasons for that. one was in the united states, we were very far behind medically. most american doctors never went to medical school and trained under doctors who never been to medicalchool. but they weresocial stigmas that we of e utmost barrier. one wa most american women would have preferred to diehan to have a man, a doctor examine their body and as a consequence, many american women di. the second thing was that cadavers were either hard to get or frowned upon in use for dissecting frowned upon pie society and they were expensive. you got them on the black market. most medical students never got chance to dissect a dead body take apart an arm or leg. in paris there was no problem about that. so they're dissecting bodies was a huge part of their medical education in paris. and they made the rounds with doctors examining female patients no less than male patients. >> charlie: i've always been fascinated by the idea of first adams, jefferson and anklin. of those three, is it automatic that jefferson loved paris more than the other two or is it hard to tell. >> i d't
on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the firestorm over phone hacking in britain put media magnate rupert murdoch on the hot seat today before a committee of parliament. along with his son and a former top executive, murdoch faced close questioning, and a closer encounter with a pie plate. outside, the sidewalks were crowded with protesters against the murdochs and their newspapers, and british prime minister david cameron. inside, rupert murdoch was confronted by british lawmakers over allegations that his tabloids hacked the p
of connection with you. >> we looked at the... the whole context, and was there someone trying to big note themselves by suggesting their connection to us? we don't have sources that we know about. and i had never heard the name bradley manning before. i never heard the name bradass87 before. ( applause ) >> smith: at a major conference last year, assange was also asked if manning was his source for the video and the cables. >> there's been this us intelligence analyst, bradley manning, arrested, and it's alleged that he professed in a chat room that he leaked this video to you, along with 280,000 classified us embassy cables. i mean, did he? >> we have denied receiving those cables. >> smith: assange was facing a dilemma. if wikileaks acknowledged having more documents alleged to have come from manning, he risked further harm to his source. did you discuss internally, amongst yourselves, whether or not the war logs and eventually the cables could further jeopardize him? >> there was discussion about, you know, we have a situation where there is a young man held in military prison under in
for the red cross we've seen with the programs $10 makes a big difference in pakistan and haiti. and i think it's bringing more attention to these topics that we would not normally. >> cokie raises an interesting point the way ads work is more and more you look at people who look just like us and look st as ugly and as bad as we do. and somehow we are supposed to identify with these people. but the fact is that there is a celebrity fever in this country. and maybe there always has been so the whole notion that i am doing the same thing as somebody famous appeals to people. never has aealed to me. but if it gets people --. >> because are you for the underdog. >> true. >> i think it's fantastic because it raises awareness on these issues. very few of us i have been privileged to travel around the world and go to ethiopia and address the issues but few of us get a chance to do that and everyone can participate and it brings awareness and knowledge. >> it is a great way to end the program is to have everyone participate with awareness and knowledge and that's it for this edition of "to the contr
? >> there is a potential connection in the sense that if the u.s. were to default, we would see a big spike in long- term interest rates, so that would affect mortgage rates. it would affect car lending rates. it would affect business lending rates. so all of that could be quite problematic for the whole economy. so that's why, you know, certainly the treasury department and one has to say the federal reserve as well very worried about this. and want to avoid this at all costs. >> ifill: does it have to actually occur or is merely this delay, this debate, is that already putting its own drag on these areas of the economy? >> well, so far i say the uncertainty about what is exactly going to happen, what's going to get cut, what could be affected is giving a lot of consumers and businesses pause, if you will, making it quite risk-averse. and one of the reasons we're going through a soft patch, it's not the only reason, one of the reasons is this uncertainty. and what is triggering is risk aversion on the part of businesses and consumers. so already in a sense they're anticipating or worried about what migh
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)